Techni(cal) Color

Informative history and technique analysis color in storytelling. This is one of those filmic elements that I consider rather than plan. However, I’m trying to (color) correct that.

Additional Note: This supercut of Kubrick’s use of color helps illustrate how powerful it can be.

Tarantino Road Warrior

There’s a curious balance in being an auteur. You need to have a unique voice, but you also can’t be too derivative of your own work. This assembly of Tarantino driving shots shows how a set piece can be a calling card, yet effectively drive (ahem) the story in each film.

Boulder Filmmaking

The thing with Spielberg is the preparation. And what I’m (slowly) learning is that you don’t necessarily have to be fast, just thorough. While Raiders was positioned as an homage, the technique behind it has made it a masterclass in and of itself. It’s not just the thought and planning behind this iconic scene that is notable, but Spielberg’s employment of top notch crew to bring his vision to life. Oh, and you’ll never guess what the sound of the boulder was…

Log On


Besides being irresistible bad-pun material, loglines are a subject close to my heart. Boiling down an entire script to one sentence is an art in and of itself. As a former (thank God) agency creative director/copywriter, you think I’d be half decent at it. Or maybe it’s why I’m not. In either case, I’m going to use this post to workshop the logline for my current project:

A heartbroken cameraman gets a job on a dating travel show whose host goes rogue hunting down a lost love.

Meh, right? Or maybe it’s meh-raculous!? Let’s find out… Continue reading

One Shot Bird

Birdman is probably the most original and compelling film I’ve seen this year. A large part of it was how the construct provided a unique platform for character development. Another was how the cinematography leveraged a confined setting to provide a dynamic theatrical experience. I had my theories as to how they filmed it on “one shot”, and was mostly right. However, it’s still fascinating to understand the method behind the madness.

Connect the Dots

I’ve written several scripts that have an easter egg or two. You know, some sly Star Wars reference or a secret meaning you never fully reveal? Taking it one step further, my current project is a re-imagining of Moby Dick set in the world of reality TV (you read right).

However, it’s mind-boggling to even comprehend the theory that every Pixar film is part of one meta story. Even more potentially brilliant is that it’s a bold treatise on humanity, technology and nature. Granted, given the universal themes of Pixar flicks, you could reverse-engineer or sorts of relationships this grandiose. Or could you?

Dustin Lance Black’s Creative Process

An informative look at Dustin Lance Black’s (“Milk,” “J. Edgar”) comprehensive screenwriting process. It’s interesting how he evolves his ideas, especially utilizing cards to develop story elements. Though I’m sure the physical nature of his system is important, I feel Trello, which I use to manage filmmaking projects, would be a great fit for his methodology.

Moving Movie Posters


With endless ways to innovate in film, I find it fascinating when simple techniques yield dramatic results. Like these GIF movie posters, which elegantly capture the character of the movies themselves. Granted, I have the cinematic experience to flashback to. But if you had never seen any of these films, wouldn’t your interest be piqued?

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